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Shopping

Rosarito has a myriad of excellent shopping locations all along Boulevard Benito Juarez, the town's main street. Shops at the north, center and south areas of town are walkable in clusters, and free street parking is easy to find everywhere.

Rosarito's large mercado, with almost 100 stalls, is just a short stroll up the main street, beginning next to the El Nido restaurant. Immediately south of town you'll find a miracle mile of pottery, gardenware, Guadalajara-cement statues and fountains, curios and rug and blanket weavers in an interesting mix of roadside shops.

Rosarito's main street is also, by far, the best place on the entire 1,000-mile Baja peninsula to buy Mexican furniture. Southwestern, pigskin, wrought-iron, hacienda, willow, hand-carved and hand-painted furniture, plus custom pieces, are all made locally. The selection is great, and specialty shops dot both sides of the street for the full length of the city.

There are many arts and crafts shops along the main boulevard in Rosarito Beach. You will also find products geared not only to the tourist, but also your home with many rustic furniture shops, ceramics shops and stained glass shops. Rosarito Beach seems to be a gathering place for artists also, so you will find some fine artwork here.

Near the El Nido restaurant, you'll find a small 'central market' with various handicrafts and gifts to bring home. It is on the beachside of the street.

With the many clubs and bars in central Rosarito, you will also find many clothing shops with the hippest club/bar gear advertising their establishment. Included in this is Señor Frogs, Papas & Beer and Rock n' Roll Taco to name a few.

Rosarito also has a wide variety of pharmacies, cigar shops, liquor stores, fireworks stores and more. Please note that U.S. Customs restricts taking these items back across the border and you should familiarize yourself with those restrictions.

You can download the pamphlet "Know Before You Go" put out by the U.S. Customs service by clicking this link Know Before You Gopdf-964KB. For the most up to date information, visit the U.S. Customs web site

Furniture

San Diego and L.A. decorators constantly carry off fabulous pieces from Baja to resell for up to 10 times the original price. The selection south of the border is astonishing, and many one-of-a-kind items are worth hiring a U-Haul.

A hand-carved, single-bed headboard featuring two cherubs can be snagged in Rosarito for about $160. A similar piece, seen recently in San Diego's Old Town, carried a price tag of $1,600. Equipal (pigskin) furniture is a low-cost, high-quality Mexican specialty that seems to last forever, indoors or out. The variety is especially impressive in Rosarito and choices include chairs, tables, sofas, love seats and full bars. A breakfast set, with four barrel chairs and a 40-inch table, can be bargained to under $400. Hand-carved, hand-painted, all-wood armoires are a steal at around $600.

Most furniture and home-furnishing items, from entertainment centers to massiv mirror frames to carousel horses, can be custom-ordered in your choice of finishes and colors. Can't find what you want? Or can't afford it north of the border? Bring a photo or magazine ad, and local craftsmen will copy it exactly. Most places don't ship. Those that do are noted below.

Best City to Shop
Head for Rosarito first for furniture and home furnishings. Much of the wrought-iron dining sets and hand-carved, hand-painted wood cabinets, chests and chairs are made locally and therefore are lower in cost.

Apisa is an 18,000-square-foot indoor-outdoor showcase of truly unique furniture pieces and personal treasures, gathered from Guanajuato, Michoacan and Guadalajara. "Wow!" is the operative word as one winds through a maze of artsy displays of one-of-a-kind briefcases ($150 to $250 for ponyskin-and-leather
combinations) and unusual equipal ottomans shaped like long, undulating snakes. High-backed, high-style willow-and-pigskin or willow-and-pony chairs hang from the ceiling, fanned for display like playing cards at $350 each.

But the real knockout items at Apisa are the oxidized-iron furniture pieces and sculptures. Life-sized matadors and bulls (around $1,500 for a set), rearing horses and fountains all look as though they've been crafted of aged and hammered copper. This same unique patina graces the all-metal armoires, entertainment centers ($500) and even dining-room tables ($750).

Expect significantly higher prices here than at other Baja shops, but these are still far below stateside prices - if you could even find the items. Apisa also ships. Located on the east side of Rosarito's main street, midtown, just north of the traffic light at the Quinta del Mar complex. Call 011-52-661-20125. Pancho's, one of the border area's oldest and most reliable curio shops, has expanded in size and is dumping much of the little stuff in favor of high-style hacienda pieces, upscale home furnishings, antique frames, wrought-iron and interesting glass and ceramic pieces.

Pancho's still carries more pottery than you can sort through, but now the entire back of this enormous establishment is more exciting than most North County decorator shops. And Pancho's prices have always been among the fairest around. For example, 36-inch, hand-carved frames run a mere $20 to $40 here, depending on the amount of intricacy. Try finding that price stateside. Located on the east side of Rosarito's main street, near the north end of town. Call 011-52- 661-20091.

La Casa de la Carreta is a family-run, roadside furniture factory, long known for high-quality, handcrafted furniture and accessories. It recently doubled in size and is still expanding. From hand-carved angels to hand-painted chests, toy boxes and headboards, the two-story, barn-like structure will keep you busy treasure hunting for hours. Custom-made and handcrafted work here sells for far less than discount-catalog prices. Pricing for each piece is based on the amount and intricacy of the carving, painting and inside detail work done on specialized pieces. Armoires and entertainment centers run from $460 to $600; hand-carved, four-drawer chests start at $160; custom headboards run $180 to $400; 3- and 4-foot carousel horses run $160 to $300. La Casa de la Carreta ships. Located at kilometer 29.5 on the Old Road, just south of Rosarito. Call 011-52-661-20502.

Prices in Mexico will vary with fluctuations in the peso. All prices on bargainable items quoted above are after bargaining. The law of supply and demand does apply in the border area. As tourists' tastes change, inventory will vary at shops that cross-sell or feature items from different categories. Specialty or one-of-a-kind items mentioned above may not always be available.

Leather

From a full-length lambskin coat or hip-length jacket to a crocodile wallet or bulls-neck boots, you'll find fine leather throughout the border area. Whether planning a large or small purchase, expect to pay 30% to 50% less than you would stateside.

Hottest items currently are copies of Versace jackets for men, belted jackets for women, laptop briefcases, NFL team jackets and of course, boots. Top-quality wallets and passport cases, in calf or lambskin, are perennial sellers at $10 to $18.

Prices on all-leather team jackets vary by type of leather, size, style and complexity of design, but generally run $200 to $320 vs. $1,200 for the same jacket in Vegas and $1,000 in catalogs. Bargain hard for these. The starting price can easily drop $100. Regular men's and women's lambskin jackets, which would retail for about $400 stateside, run as low as $120.

Kids leather and suede jackets run between $30 and $60, depending on size and skin. Great bargains are toddler and children's suede vests, lined with sheepskin and sold for about $10.

Boots are exceptional buys, in every skin from alligator to ostrich, and are generally about half of stateside prices. Most popular are bulls-neck, at a savings of about $40 a pair, and lizard and snakeskin at significantly more. At the top of the line, ostrich boots, in every conceivable color, run $250 vs. $500 stateside.

Throughout the border area you'll also find an almost overwhelming array of leather purses, backpacks, wallets, tooled belts, camera and video cases, briefcases and luggage in a variety of colors, skins and styles.

Particularly good buys are the 30-inch, all-leather airline carry-on bags, seen everywhere, in every hue. They sell for an average of $20 but can be found for as little as $12 in patchwork colors. Check to make sure they are double-stitched and have sturdy zippers.

Insider Tips
Patchwork is always the best leather bargain because it uses the small, leftover pieces from other items. A well-made patchwork fanny pack might run $5; a backpack $12. A highly styled woman's jacket that looks like a jeweled mosaic of suedes and leathers would be fairly priced at around $60. The selection is enormous everywhere.

Best City to Shop
Tijuana is the leather capital of Mexico. The selection is vast, the competition fierce and bargaining is great. Cruise Avenida Revolucion in Tijuana and Boulevard Lopez Mateos in Ensenada for the best variety in all-leather items and boots. Skip Rosarito for leather, except for smaller items - such as video-camera cases, backpacks, fanny packs and purses - found in the mercado and curio shops. The mercado is your best bet in Rosarito because of its concentrated comparative-shopping area and its friendly and easy bargaining atmosphere.

Best Shops in Tijuana
Sasson Leather Factory is boot-freak heaven, with so many styles, colors and skins that indecisive types might have an anxiety attack. Ask owner Raquel Sasson anything about leather. She's funny, fair and knowledgeable. Along with a wide variety of men's and women's jackets, Sasson will also copy any leather jacket ($200 vs. $1,300 stateside), will custom-design jackets and boots and will ship, insured. The workmanship is top-quality, and no illegal skins are sold. Located on the east side of the street, three doors from the corner of Avenida Revolucion and Third. The Leather Factory in the Pasaje Revolucion arcade is team-jacket headquarters, along with having a terrific selection of regular leather jackets in all styles. Jackets can be made to order here in four hours. Ask gregarious owner Pepe Ortiz to do his famous lighter or nitric-acid tricks to distinguish real leather from vinyl or 14-karat gold from fake. Located midblock on Avenida Revolucion, between Third and Fourth on the east side of the street.

Hernando's Curios has an excellent selection of purses and briefcases, along with a bit of everything else. Prices on laptop briefcases vary by the number of compartments, size, type of skin and workmanship, but a typical calfskin case with multiple pockets runs about half the price as in the United States. Other calfskin and young bullskin briefcases run $50 to $100 and generally represent a 45% savings. Ask for Enrique. Hernando's is the first shop on the left at the foot of the stairs in underground Pasaje Gomez arcade. The arcade is on the east side of Avenida Revolucion between Third and Fourth. The shop's sign says Leather Factory.

Best Shops in Ensenada
Plaza Bucareli is the place to go for Ensenada's best comparative leather shopping, with a half-dozen specialty stores all in one mini-arcade. From hundreds of leather hats to shoes, purses, boots and even saddles, the selection and bargaining are great here. Located at Avenida Lopez Mateos and Macheros, next to the Leather
House.

Maribel Leather Shop has the most extensive variety of wearable leather in town, from jackets and pants to team jackets, hats, belts and even chaps. Prices are fair here; team jackets, for example, start at $165. In addition to the usual multicolor team jackets, Maribel's also carries a classier version in two-tone, beige-and-brown suede. While you're here, check out the fascinating collection of knives, sabers and other strange, James Bond-type instruments in Maribel's front window. Located at Avenidas Lopez Mateos and Macheros, next to the Leather House in Plaza Bucareli. Call 011-52- 617-81055.

El Escorial Leather House, a landmark for navigation on Avenida Lopez Mateos, is a must-stop for any Ensenada shopper. While the store no longer carries upscale leather items, owner Rocio Guerra is the straightest shooter in town and will generously take time to tell you all the insider secrets of the city, from the best places to shop for any kind of merchandise to the best place to find a clean bathroom. The shop now carries the biggest selection of quality Mexican sandals, along with 5,000 T-shirts. Even if you're not in the market for either, stop for an information fix from this delightful woman. The Leather House is the prominent white building on the corner of Avenidas Lopez Mateos and Macheros. Call 011-52-617-40332.

Sonora Leather Shop, which looks like a hole in the wall from the street, is actually purse paradise, with one of the largest selections in the entire border area. Besides all the usual leather items, the shop also carries riding gear, a wide variety of holsters and rifle cases, great leather caps and Stetsons, and a lot more. Bargain hard here, and totally ignore the owner's high-pressure pushiness. Located at Avenidas Lopez Mateos and Macheros, across from the Leather House. Call 011-52-617-82671.

Pharmaceuticals

Border-area pharmacies have multiplied like bunnies on Pergonal, supplying a mostly U.S. clientele. Where once there were drugstores every few blocks, now you'll find streets in the heavily populated tourist areas with a "farmacia" on each corner and another midblock.

Snowbirds finance week-long south-of-the-border vacations just by stocking up on regular medications. From youth-in-a-tube Renova and Retin-A to antibiotics, fertility drugs, ulcer, heart and high-blood-pressure medications, 98% of the most prescribed drugs in America cost 30% to 40% less in Mexico.

Since the United States funds most of the research-and-development costs for the rest of the world, Baja shoppers benefit - on both name brands and generics. Not only are most drugs available on an over-the-counter basis, but pharmacists have a great deal more authority in Mexico. If you feel like you're coming down with the flu on your weekend away, just visit your friendly pharmacist and you can get a shot in the butt, right in the back room.

How good can pharmaceutical savings be? A 60-gram tube of Renova, which costs about $70 in L.A. and $80 in San Diego (after a visit to a cosmetic surgeon or dermatologist for a prescription), is available under the brand name Stevia in Mexico for less than $14. And it's exactly the same formula.

Popular birth-control and estrogen-therapy prescription Premarin is about $25 for a month's supply at San Diego discount drugstore chains; the identical box is sold over the counter in Baja for about $14. Ativan, the second-most-prescribed US anti-anxiety drug, recently was increased to about 80 cents per pill stateside; border-area price: 27 cents per pill.

It can be easy to buy over-the-counter in Mexico, but don't think you can bring enough medications over the border to start your own pharmacy. Here's the letter of the law: Mexican law does require a prescription - from a Mexican physician - for painkillers, tranquilizers and many diet pills. Antibiotics, antidepressants, heart medication, birth control pills and some other classifications do not require a prescription for purchase. However, you are required to declare imported medications before re-entering the United States, and if the drug requires a prescription here, you will be asked to produce a prescription (in your name) from a US or Mexican doctor. The US allows you to import foreign medications for personal use, generally defined as a 90-day supply.

Insider tips
Prices vary in the border area, according to what the tourist vs. the local market will bear. Try a pharmacy a block or two from the main drag, and you might get a price break of a buck or two per item. Don't stray too far off the beaten path, though, or you may not find English-speaking personnel.

Best city to shop
Reputable pharmacies are literally everywhere in Tijuana, Rosarito and Ensenada. Those closest to the main tourist centers are most knowledgeable about what visitors are looking for and stock up on those items.

Pottery

From walls of smiling ceramic suns to rows of fierce cement lions that will guard your gates, Rosarito is the only place to fill up your garden, your yard, your hearth or your patio for a pittance.

Pots R Us is the nickname locals have given to the mile-long row of pottery shops on the Old Road, just south of town.

Here you'll find an absolutely mind-boggling selection of pots, patio hibachis, gardenware, statuary, cementware and curios.

Don't even think about shopping for clay crocodiles, frog crocks or dolphin fountains in Tijuana or Ensenada. Pottery runs toward the gaudy in Tijuana (who wants a garden urn that glitters?) and toward the ho-hum in Ensenada. There's little selection in either city and, therefore, no bargaining clout. But bargains abound in Rosarito, and bargaining is definitely expected.

In San Diego, an unadorned, 24-inch cement birdbath can carry a price tag of $65. In Rosarito, a better-quality birdbath, with a cherub centerpiece, is just $20. A 36-inch clay patio furnace, which can be bargained down as low as $20 at Rosarito's Pancho's (if you're making other purchases), is a nonbargainable $65 or more in Old Town.

Insider tips
Most Rosarito pottery shops carry similar merchandise and are owned by members of two extended families. If you can't find something at one place, ask and they'll probably send you to a cousin just down the street. The best bargaining strategy is to browse a place, ask pricing questions as you go, mentally tally up everything you want and ask for the best price if you buy it all there. You should get at least 20% off for multiple-item buys.

Best shops in Rosarito
Pancho's and Consuelo's offer just about every shape and size of funky clay or cement animal that can hold a plant or function as a fountain. Pancho's is consistently one of the fairest dealers in the field and will take the time to explain why a 6-inch Oaxacan pot costs $5 while a 24-inch Rosarito pot may only cost only $4. These two shops are located side by side on the east side of Rosarito's main street near the north end of town. Call 011-52-661-20091.

Curios Tizoc, like others along pottery row, has a veritable farm field of pots and statuary from which to pick. A scalloped 30-inch-wide fountain with base is just $40. A 24-inch stone lion is just $10. Two-tone ceramic suns are $8, and smaller suns run between $3 and $5. Prices and selection are good at this establishment just south of town, and the atmosphere is low-key. Located just south of Rosarito, on the Old Road.

Virgo Mexican Art, also on pottery row, is a good combo stop. There's a full selection of gardenware outside and reasonably priced furniture and crafts inside. Virgo is usually a great place to bargain for pigskin furniture. Located just south of Rosarito, on the Old Road. Call 011-52-661-22357.

Silver

Mexico is one of the world's leading producers of silver. Fine sterling jewelry, in original designs for both men and women, is available at stores in all three border cities. Sterling items in Mexico are so pure that they can be up to 95% silver and will be stamped accordingly. Prices on most items will be about half of those stateside.

High-demand items are necklaces, bracelets, earrings and rings in pure sterling or set with onyx, lapis, malachite or turquoise stones. For men, cufflinks, belt buckles, card cases and money clips are popular. Also hot are silver bead necklaces and chokers in all sizes, widths and lengths.

Prices run about $90 for a 24-inch sterling bead necklace, $75 for a half-inch-wide I.D. bracelet, $100 for a lapis-and-silver bracelet and about $50 for a silver-plated wine goblet. While hard bargaining is not the norm at upscale jewelry stores, you should always ask for a discount and may get up to 25%, depending on the slowness of the season.

In addition to the real stuff, you'll come across street vendors carrying enormous cases of "sort-of silver" necklaces, rings, bracelets and earrings. (You won't have to look for them; they'll find you.) As long as you bargain hard and remember that the jewelry on the street isn't pure silver, but alpaca (a mixture of copper, tin and silver), you can make some great buys and have fun cruising the trays. Try to pay about half the vendor's first asking price, less if you really like to bargain. What's a fair price? Whatever the piece is worth to you for a year of wear.

Insider tips How do you tell real sterling from fake? In Mexico, all sterling, by law, must be stamped 0.925, which is the legal percent of silver required. It also must carry the word "Mexico," along with the tax identification number of the company and the initials of the city of origin (for example, Tc for Taxco). Even the tiniest charm must carry all four of these verifying marks, and they do in the shops of reputable dealers and designers.

Approximately 95% of the "silver" on the street, in mercado stalls and Avenida Revolucion sidewalk shops is fake, even though the sellers swear it's real, bite it, hold lighters under it and even show you a 0.925 stamp on larger pieces. Only real silver will carry all four identifying marks, but vendors figure that even savvy tourists aren't that savvy.

So, unless you are in an upscale shop that deals exclusively in silver and better jewelry, assume everything else is fake. Which is fine. Pay accordingly (which means a pittance), and plan to throw the fake piece away when the thin coating of silver wears off.

Best shops in Tijuana Jorge Espinosa has been one of most respected names in fine silver for decades in Tijuana. A superb designer in both silver and gold, Espinosa's prices are extremely fair, and he's built up a solid following of Americans. His shop carries a wide selection of original jewelry, along with frames, jewelry boxes, belt buckles and money clips. Located in the Ciros arcade, on the east side of Avenida Revolucion between Fifth and Sixth streets. Call 011-52-66-850705.

Los Castillo is one of Mexico's most reputable names in sterling, with large shops in Tijuana's Bazar de Mexico and three others in Ensenada. Each shop carries famed Taxco designer Antonio Castillo's work. While no custom design work is done in Baja California, the shops do carry a wide selection of high-quality jewelry for men and women, along with other items, all priced very fairly. A 10% to 15% discount is usually given for cash sales. Located in the front of Bazar de Mexico at Av. Revolucion and Seventh street. Call 011-52- 66-384691.

Best shops in Rosarito
Baja Jewels is a well-respected outlet for fine silver jewelry and gems, and designer Enrique Orozco is known for his spectacular original creations in pendants, pins and rings. Look for large amethysts in knockout settings. Located in the Rosarito Beach Hotel shopping arcade at the south end of town.

Best shops in Ensenada
Los Castillo (see above) has three shops on Avenida Lopez Mateos - located at No. 656 and 815 and in Bazar Ramirez. Call the main store in Ensenada at
011-52-617-83963.

Alcohol

Tequila and Kahlua aren't the only great booze buys across the border. They're just the most popular with tourists and the most outrageously priced north of the border. Consider the savings: A liter of Kahlua at Ralphs supermarket is normally about $25. Almost anywhere in the border area you can buy the same bottle for about $8. A liter of Hornitos, a popular midrange tequila, was $18 at Ralphs and $11.38 in Mexico. That same week Cuervo Gold, considered pretty low on the tequila ladder in Mexico, was going for between $7 and $8. Ralphs price: $19.

OK, so it does pay to pick up that bottle of something, per person, per trip. But, if you visit Baja often, there also are great buys on other spirits. Osa Negra gin, which is pretty good stuff, is about $6 a liter south of the border. Oso Negro vodka, also good, and Bacardi white rum are both under $6.

The best places to buy booze in Mexico are off the tourist strip. It stands to reason that those oh-so-convenient liquor stores, right next to the biggest hotels, or that last liquor store as you're walking back to the border in Tijuana, is going to slap a tourist tax on you. So try to buy where Mexicans buy - at any ordinary liquor store or, even better, the supermarket. You often can save up to $2 per bottle by buying like a local.

Three supermarket chains dominate the border area: Calimax, La Comercial Mexicana and Gigante. They feature extensive liquor sections and, usually, the best prices around.

While you're there, check out the savings on some other common Mexican bargains, like vanilla and coffee. Vanilla runs about $4.50 for 8 ounces at stateside supermarkets; in Mexico, the same amount costs about $1 at supermarkets, more along the tourist strips. Mexican coffee is another undiscovered bargain, with $3-per-pound savings over similar, gourmet-quality coffees sold stateside.

Insider Tips
If you're a tequila connoisseur, listen up. Hundreds of brands of tequila exist, not just the three or four that gringos drink. There are gourmet tequilas in hand-painted wooden folk-art boxes (Reserva de la Familia, $85), in crystal decanters too beautiful to empty (Casa Herradura Limited Edition, $220) and in hand-blown bottles with a glass cactus created inside as part of the bottle (Porfidio, $100). Tequilas can be sharp, smooth, smokey and as different as fine cigars. And most midrange tequilas are better than sippin' whiskey, which is the way they were meant to be drunk.

Best shops in Rosarito
One of the border area's best-kept secrets is Mercado del Mar, a small Rosarito market that carries the best and most exotic liquor supply in the region, at prices as good as the supermarkets. You'll find at least 50 brands of tequilas to sample here, from bottom to top of the line. There's also an excellent selection of Baja wines at very low prices, aged mescals and more rums than you ever knew existed - including Cuban rums that can't be purchased in the States. Stop by just to browse. You'll find something new to try every trip. Located just south of Rosarito at kilometer 29.5 on the Old Road. Open Sundays through Thursdays 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Fridays and Saturdays until 11 p.m. Call 011-52-661-20110.

Baskets, Blankets and Rugs

The numerous Indian peoples of Mexico create marvels of beauty with their centuries-old weaving skills.

From beautiful Zapotec Indian wall hangings and rugs woven by villagers from Oaxaca, to colorful hammocks of hemp and cotton made in Merida, to baskets of every kind and blankets of every pattern, these handmade treasures are among Mexico's best buys.

At Pier 1, an unadorned, 18-inch open basket costs around $25. Across the border, heavy-duty, lidded baskets, up to 36 inches tall, 20 inches in diameter and tough enough to store kids' toys or firewood, can be picked up for $5. Four dollars will get you a big, beautiful, woven beach or diaper bag, embossed with colorful straw flowers. In Old Town, coarse-cotton, striped Mexican blankets are priced from $9.95 to $11.95. South of the border, they are sold at almost every street corner and shop for $4.99. These blankets are lively and colorful enough to use as area rugs, accent pieces, tablecloths and furniture throws, and sturdy enough to line Fido's bed or double as car seat covers and beach blankets. Bargain hard for these and buy a bunch on every trip across the border.

Heavy-duty hammocks for two can be had for $8 in every color; even sturdier hammocks, with wooden end pieces, run $12 to $15 in single or double width.

Insider tips
Bargaining for blankets is always better when you buy two or more and wherever there is competition close by. If many stalls or shops are within earshot of each other, and all carry large selections of blankets and wall hangings, bargaining is a breeze.

Best city to shop
Basket selection is best in Rosarito at the curio and pottery shops at the south end of town. Hammocks are most plentiful in Rosarito's main-street mercado. The best selection of Zapotec rugs and wall hangings, along with the best blanket selections, are found in the multiple shops and stalls of Tijuana's underground Pasaje Gomez, on Avenida Revolucion, between Third and Fourth streets; in Rosarito's mercado; and in Bazar Ramirez on Avenida Lopez Mateos in Ensenada. Wovenware is universally bargainable.

Prices in Mexico will vary with fluctuations in the peso. All prices on bargainable items quoted above are after bargaining. The law of supply and demand does apply in the border area. As tourists' tastes change, inventory will vary at shops that cross-sell or feature items from different categories. Specialty or one-of-a-kind items mentioned above may not always be available.

Some of the many shops in Rosarito

HANDCRAFTS AND CURIOS
Arts and Crafts Market More than 500 stores, shops and stalls carry the best of Mexico's fine arts, crafts, clothing and leather goods, along with the best of the world's imports at great duty-free savings. Best of all, it's all so browsably easy here. (You can even bargain on the beach!)
Puerto Nuevo
46 stalls
Plaster, silver, clay, blankets, leather, ceramics and rustic furniture km. 45 Carr.Libre Tij a Ens, Puertio Nuevo  
Curios Linda Vista Cement, plaster and ceramic figures km. 44 Carr.Libre Tij a Ens, El Pescador  
Curios Armando Cement, plaster and ceramic figures km. 44 Carr.Libre Tij a Ens, El Pescador 614-1250
Curios Las Gaviotas Cement, plaster and ceramic figures km. 42.5 Carr.Libre Tij a Ens, El Pescador 614-1422
Curios Lupita Cement and ceramic figures, blown glass km. 42 Carr. Libre Tij. a Ens, Las Gaviotas 614-1431
Curios Freddy Ceramic and cement figures km. 42 Carr. Libre Tij. a Ens 614-1422
La Casa del Arte Ceramic figures and decorative accessories km. 41.5 Carr. Libre Tij. a Ens 614-1201
Curios Guanajuato Ceramic figures and crafts km. 41 Carr. Libre Tij. a Ens 614-1706
Curios Las Gaviotas Ceramic and cement figures km. 40 Carr. Libre Tij. a Ens 614-1075
La Ceramica de Javier Ramirez Ceramics, flooring, Mexican tile km. 40 Carr. Libre Tij. a Ens 613-2107
A Broken Art Paintings, fine ironwork km. 40 Carr. Libre Tij. a Ens  
Curios el Barro Plaster and ceramic figures Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Torres Black ceramics, blown glass, talavera Popotla, just south of Fox Studios 612-4765
Curios Romero Crafts Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Esperanza Cement and ceramic figures Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Alba Ceramics, flooring, Mexican tile Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Popotla Mexican art Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Ricardo Fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Diseños Varios Fine stained glass Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Popotla de Jose Vazquez Cement, plaster figures, carrizo (wooden stick furniture) Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Casa Nieto Ceramic figures Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Casa del Vidrio Biselado Fine stained glass Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios el Arco Fine ironwork, Mexican art Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Nieto Crafts Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Eduardo Talavera, plaster, blown glass, fine ironworks Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Oxid-arte Mirrors, lamps, decorative items Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Mexico Magico Painting, jewelry, talavera, mirrors, ceramics Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Hernandez Ceramics, fine ironwork, glass, rustic furniture Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Lupita Ceramics, cement and wooden items Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Galeria Estudio Painting workshop Popotla, just south of Fox Studios 613-6557
La Casa del Sol Ceramic and clay figures, blown glass Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios el Amigo Ceramic and cement figures Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Mary Esther Ceramics, fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Lety Ceramics, glass Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Ricardos Ornamental Iron Factory Fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios 683-9408
Alfareria Tlaquepaque Clay, cement and plaster figures, glass, fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios 605-3100
Curios Vicky Talavera, blown glass, clay and plaster figures, fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios 616-7416
Curios Cantera Clay, plaster and cantera (stone) figures, fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios el Coyote Clay figures, talavera, glass and fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Dulcelandia Mexican candy, ceramics, fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios (Local number) 044 661-616-6128
Curios Vegas Clay, cement and plaster figures, fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Buena Casa Clay, ceramic and fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Estrada Clay, ceramics and fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  
Curios Karina Clay figures and fine ironwork Popotla, just south of Fox Studios 616-1571
Curios Los Arcos Clay figures, fine ironwork, talavera, blown glass Popotla, just south of Fox Studios 616-7968
Materiales Internacionales Clay and cement figures km. 32.5 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens. 612-4381
Curios Lomeli Clay and cement figures km. 32.5 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens. 612-9033
Curios El Turista Clay and cement figures km. 32.5 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens.  
El Tanalito Bazar Fine ironwork km. 32.5 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens.  
Artesanias Lopez Mirrors, talavera, fine ironwork km. 32.5 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens. 613-0025
Curios Vista al Mar Cement figures km. 32.5 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens.  
Curios Maldonado Mexican crafts km. 32 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens.  
Los Angeles Curios Clay and cement figures km. 32 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens.  
Metal Express Inc Fine ironwork, marble and granite items km. 32 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens.  
Casa Don Valerio Clay, glass and fine ironwork km. 31 Carr. Libre Tij. Ens.  
Arte y Diseño Calderon Fine ironwork km. 31 Carr. Libre Tij. Ens. 613-1982
Artesanias Vazquez Plaster figures km. 31 Carr. Libre Tij. Ens. 612-5365
Curios de Coleccion Fine ironwork km. 31 Carr. Libre Tij. Ens.  
Rancho Curios Mexican crafts km. 30.5 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Curios Chelin Flower pots with sea stones and cement km. 30.5 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Curios Los Hermanos Clay and cement figures, fine ironwork and wooden rustic furniture km. 30 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Curios Jose Clay and cement figures, fine ironwork km. 30 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Carpenteria y Ebanisteria del Puerto Clay and cement figures, fine ironwork km. 29.5 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Alfareria Michoacan Cement figures km. 29.5 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Iron Garden Fine ironwork and cantera (wooden stick furniture) km. 29.5 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Tienda Gonzalez Wool tapestries km. 29.5 Carr. Libre a Ens. 613-0780
Curios Yadira Clay, cement and talavera figures km. 29.5 Carr. Libre a Ens. 612-1424
Curios La Piñata Clay and cement figures, rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork km. 29 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Lomeli Tile Mexican tile km. 29 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Curios Tizoc Clay and cement figures km. 29 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Rusticos del Sol Clay, plaster, talavera, wooden rustic furniture km. 29 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Curios Pepes Shell in cement figures km. 28.5 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
D'Cantera Cantera (wooden stick furniture) km. 28.5 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Artesanias Mexicanas La Potente Fine ironwork km. 28 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Metal Zoo Fine ironwork km. 28 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
El Sahuan Fine ironwork km. 28 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Metal Zoo Fine ironwork km. 28 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
El Sahuan Fine ironwork km. 28 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Cielito Lindo Clay and cement figures km. 28 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Martinez Inc. Fine ironwork, granito, rustic wooden furniture km. 28 Carr. Libre a Ens.  
Plaza del Sol Mexican crafts, silver, glass Center, Rosarito Beach Hotel shops  
Curios Marias Talavera, ceramics, clothing Center, Rosarito Beach Hotel shops  
Curios Colibri Decoratives articles and clothing Center, Rosarito Beach Hotel shops  
Curios Margarita Clay figures, glass and clothing Center, Rosarito Beach Hotel shops  
Curios Ole Ole Clay, decorative articles Blvd.B.Juarez  
SILVER
Curios Las Palmas Fine ironwork, clay, plaster, blown glass Blvd.B.Juarez #304 612-1784
Curios Rosarito Clay plaster, cement figures and glass Blvd.B.Juarez #1025  
Villa Curios Clay, plaster, cement figures and glass Blvd.B.Juarez #332  
Curios Costa Alegre Silver, decorative articles, leather, clothing Blvd.B.Juarez #16  
Curios Perla Maya Silver, serapes, clay, glass Blvd.B.Juarez #62-b  
Adrianos Curios Silver, serapes Blvd.B.Juarez  
Curios Martinez Silver, talavera, clothing Blvd.B.Juarez  
Bazar Acapulco 93 Silver, decorative articles Blvd.B.Juarez #17  
Curios Soko's Silver, leather, clothing, paintings Blvd.B.Juarez #54a  
FURNITURE
Stay tuned for information about this year's Furniture and Art Expo, organized AFAMARO www.afamaro.com
Rusticos Popotla Rustic wooden furniture km. 33.5 Carr. Libre Tij. A Ens, Popotla 616-1703
Curios la Covacha Rustic wooden furniture, cement figures km. 32.5 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens.  
El Mueble Rustico Rustic furniture and fine ironwork km. 32.5 Carr.Libre Tij. Ens.  
Curios Titanic Rustic wooden furniture, cement figures km. 31. Carr.Libre Tij. Ens. 612-0005
Diseños Rusticos Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 31. Carr.Libre Tij. Ens.  
El Toro Viejo Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 30 y 30.5 Carr.Libre a Ens. 613-1901
Curios Yaqui Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 30 y 30.5 Carr.Libre a Ens. 613-1908
Factory Hacienda Santa Maria Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 30 Carr.Libre a Ens.  
Casa La Carreta Rustic wooden furniture km. 30 Carr.Libre a Ens.  
Shalom Mueble Rustico Rustic wooden furniture km. 29.5 Carr.Libre a Ens.  
Interiores Los Rios Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 29 Carr.Libre a Ens.  
Red Designs Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 29 Carr.Libre a Ens. 613-5423
Rusticos Don Leo Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 29 Carr.Libre a Ens.  
P.B. Home Garden Rustic wooden furniture km. 28.5 Carr.Libre a Ens. 619-295-4851
Casa Rustica Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 28 Carr.Libre a Ens.  
Marble Moon Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 28 Carr.Libre a Ens.  
Curios Alex Rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork, cement figures and ceramics km. 28 Carr.Libre a Ens.  
Fausto Polanco, Hacienda Collection Rustic wooden furniture and fine ironwork km. 28 Carr.Libre a Ens. 612-5424
Bazar La Polilla Rustic wooden furniture Blvd.B.Juarez #310-a  
Casa Vieja Rustic wooden furniture Blvd.B.Juarez #310-b 612-3613
Casa Torres Rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork, glass and ceramics Blvd.B.Juarez Ctro.Com.Hotel Rosarito  
La Lagartija Furniture and accessories Blvd.B.Juarez #94 613-1288
Touch Designs Rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork, glass and marble Blvd.B.Juarez #96 612-0051
The Convent Rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork, talavera and ceramics Blvd.B.Juarez #188 Rosarito  
Interiores Los Rios Rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork, tapestries Blvd.B.Juarez #189  
La Mision Bazar Rustic wooden furniture Blvd.B.Juarez #192  
Curios Mexico Rustic wooden furniture, ceramics, plaster and cement figures Blvd.B.Juarez #206  
Casa Bonita Rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork, lamps Blvd.B.Juarez #215  
La Mision del Viejo Rustic wooden furniture, ceramics, talavera, paintings Blvd.B.Juarez #139 612-1576
La Hacienda Rustic wooden furniture and Mexican art Blvd.B.Juarez #293 612-0721
Cosmos Artesanias Rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork, ceramics, talavera Blvd.B.Juarez #350  
Curios Chac Rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork, talavera and plaster items Blvd.B.Juarez #340 612-0882
Filish Furniture Rustic wooden furniture Blvd.B.Juarez #318 612-0091
Panchos Curios Rustic wooden furniture, fine ironwork, arts and crafts Blvd.B.Juarez #316 612-0091
ART GALLERIES
Galeria del Mar Art, sculpture, framing Center, Rosarito Beach Hotel shops  
Galeria Frida Frames, paintings Center, across from Festival Plaza  
Galeria Georgio Santini Fine art, jewelry South, km. 40 Carr.Libre Tij a Ens 614-1858
Gallery Sol Rojo Painting workshop km. 29.5 Carr.Libre a Ens.  
Polo's Gallery /Studio Art, painting and sculpture Popotla, just south of Fox Studios  

For more information, see also:
Baja Life Online
Rosarito.org



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